507. Looking for Russians at the North York Festival 2014

Copyright ©2014 Ruth Lor Malloy

Copyright ©2014 Ruth Lor Malloy

Ruth writes: No kidding. I chose to go to this festival in early August because it advertised “Special Community Tents (Chinese, Persian, Korean, Russian,…)”. I had been looking to expand my contacts in Toronto’s Russian community. I have several connections providing information about the Korean, Persian and other cultures mentioned, but none with the Russians. I wanted to know what, when and where are their festivals, the ones that other Torontonians can attend? Where can students practice their Russian skills with native speakers for free? I wanted to know the best Russian restaurants in Toronto? Where can we learn what our Russians neighbours – not the Russian government — feel about Russia’s involvement with Ukraine? Is our news media giving us a one-sided view?

Copyright ©2014 Ruth Lor Malloy

Copyright ©2014 Ruth Lor Malloy

When I arrived at Mel Lastman Square a half hour after the announced starting time, vendors were still setting up tents. A quick tour of the few set up showed no signs of Russians. But near Yonge Street, a man and woman in what looked like African costumes were singing 1960s songs. “Come on let’s Twist again.” They were wonderful, lively and enjoying themselves. I couldn’t help smiling. Jimmy and Ligia Van Rosi were from Kenya, they said. They sing Kenyan songs too and they loved performing.

Copyright ©2014 Ruth Lor Malloy

Copyright ©2014 Ruth Lor Malloy

Feeling good from this surprise, I continued with a slower tour of the tents while the music was still audible. Only a handful of festival goers were there. The weather was great, sunny yet comfortable. Vendors had time to talk. Bottles and boxes of Planters nuts were on sale. 2 for $5. Why so cheap? “They are from the Downsview Market,” came the reply. I could not resist a bargain and bought some.

Copyright ©2014 Ruth Lor Malloy

Copyright ©2014 Ruth Lor Malloy

Lorena (Italian) and Lily from Palestine were selling beautiful costume jewellery and sun glasses. The glasses were two for $10. They had tags listing them as over $200. They didn’t look that expensive but they were better than those in the next stall with the Slavic-looking guys. But what the heck? I bought two pairs. Lily said their goods were usually sold in Downsview Market. I’ve been wanting to shop in this weekend market but never had the time. Here was an opportunity!!

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Interesting was the booth set up to look for stem cell and marrow transplant donors. It looked like Persian was written on it. I had heard it was difficult to find donors in communities where donating is not traditional. I wanted to question the people at the booth, but they didn’t seem to want to talk.

Copyright ©2014 Ruth Lor Malloy

Copyright ©2014 Ruth Lor Malloy

Next was a banker of Iranian background. Shirazi knew the name of a Persian restaurant. When we talked about the effect of the sanctions on Toronto’s Persian community, he said the currency rate was higher and a limit was put on money from Iran. People here were suffering. Sanctions should be against the government, not the people, he said.

Copyright ©2014 Ruth Lor Malloy

Copyright ©2014 Ruth Lor Malloy

The Shahrzad booth displaying expensive chocolates and Persian treats was next. Taking pictures of the fancy packages and asking questions rewarded me with a delicious sample. My husband is on a sugar-free diet, but not me. Yummy.

Copyright ©2014 Ruth Lor Malloy

Copyright ©2014 Ruth Lor Malloy

A child was climbing a mountain. Children are always fascinating, especially when they might fall.

Copyright ©2014 Ruth Lor Malloy

Copyright ©2014 Ruth Lor Malloy

A friendly woman tried to entice me into buying a snow cone from her niece’s stall. Lisa was born in England of Jamaican parents. She had visited Jamaica and loved it, she said. She asked about my background and had I been to China? Jamaica was so beautiful, “a diamond in the rough.” She told me to go visit. I wondered about the crime rate there, but she assured me that many areas were nice and safe, not just the resorts. She warned me not “to wave money around.” There were places in Toronto that weren’t safe either. You had to avoid those too, she said.

Time went quickly. I had almost forgotten the Russians. I had another festival to go to. The only booth without any signs was one full of cheap sun glasses. The Slavic-looking guys attending it were dressed in white undershirts. They looked grouchy and unfriendly. I asked if they were Russian. “No, Polish,” one of them replied. Too bad for you, guys, I thought as I left empty-handed.  But my trip to Mel Lastman Square had not been entirely wasted.

For more information: www.NorthYorkFestival.com.
Let us know your adventures in Multicultural Toronto. Drop us a line at ruthlormalloy@gmail.com.

2 Comments

  1. Hi Ruth,

    I see you are still on the Festival circuit.

    It is interesting that individual festivals represent so many different cultures. We all remember Caravan where one building or tent represented one country.

    I wonder why this has happened?

    Perhaps some vendors travel from one festival to another. Maybe visitors to the festival like having many cultures represented at the festival in their area?

    Are there still some festivals that represent only one group Japanese Cultural Centre? the Hindu temple we visited?

    One Sunday I went to a meditation gathering at a Buddhist temple on Crawford Street. They didn’t say anything that wouldn’t be heard at a Christian meditation. One weekend I am going to take a half day course at a Zen temple in High Park.

    It would have been interesting if you had been able to talk to some Russians. Are any vendor owners willing to talk politics?

    Sandra

  2. Yes, I’m am sure some of the vendors would be willing to talk politics when they have time. Basically each festival has a core of vendor belonging to the host nationality. But yes, many vendors of different backgrounds go from festival to different festival. That’s how they make a living.
    By the way, the nuts I bought were stale. Ruth.

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